The 1838 view of grand villas and windmills in Potts Point, Kings Cross and Darlinghurst. [NLA: John Carmichael and James Maclehose, 'Wooloomooloo from Domain Road', published by J. Maclehose, 1838, <http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-136125552>]

The 1838 view of grand villas and windmills in Potts Point, Kings Cross and Darlinghurst. [NLA: John Carmichael and James Maclehose, 'Wooloomooloo from Domain Road', published by J. Maclehose, 1838, <http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-136125552>]



 

 

 

Authors: Liz Gorman, Dr Sue Rosen

Research: David Rosen

Client: Tanner Kibble Denton Architects for City of Sydney

 

A windmill in Kings Cross?! Sounds absurd, right? Well, how about TWO windmills, and another couple down the road in Darlinghurst?

In the 1830s, the skyline of what we now call Potts Point, Kings Cross and Darlinghurst was a far-cry from the high-rises and cheek-by-jowl terraces and apartments of today. One could gaze across Woolloomooloo Bay and admire the view of grand villas set in acreages of fine, cultivated gardens, and watch the windmills spin in the harbour breeze.

Using existing heritage studies and histories underpinned with primary source material, Sue Rosen Associates follow the evolution of the pensinsula from a Gadigal meeting and camping place, to its colonial development into gentlemen's estates, and the beginning of subdivision in the 1840s; capturing the democratisation of Sydney's first exclusive suburb and its gradual transformation into Australia's most densly populated area.

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